Goat Feeding Does in Late Gestation

Feeding does in late gestation

Energy requirements increase dramatically in late pregnancy. Using the Langston Interactive Nutrient Calculator (LINC), calculate the nutrient requirements for a 130-pound, mature Boer doe, 140 days pregnant (10 days from kidding), gaining no weight, other than that due to pregnancy, and carrying twins. Under question 3, after clicking the box for greater than 95 days pregnant, a form drops down for pregnancy number (twins), breed (predicts birth weight, can enter yours if known), …

Goat Body Condition Score 3

Contents


BCS 1

BCS 3

Description

Visual aspect of the goat: The backbone is not prominent. Ribs are barely discernible; an even layer of fat covers them. Intercostal spaces can be felt by using pressure.

The spinous processes of the lumbar vertebrae cannot be easily grasped because the …

Goat Body Condition Score 1

Contents


BCS 1

Description

Visual aspect of the goat: Emaciated and weak animal. The backbone is highly visible and forms a continuous ridge. The flank is hollow. Ribs are clearly visible. There is no fat cover and fingers easily penetrate into intercostal spaces (between ribs).

The spinous processes of the …

Goat Artificial Raising of Kids

Artificial Raising of Kids

Sometimes it is necessary to bottle feed young kids due to death of the mother or the mother’s refusing to take them. Milk feeding of commercial meat goats is usually not economical. It may be avoided by cross-fostering kids onto another doe as described under the goat management section. If a bottle raised kid is with other kids and does, it may learn to steal sufficient milk to raise itself. Kids can be raised on cow …

Goat Body Condition Score 2

Contents


BCS 1

BCS 2

Description

Visual aspect of the goat: Slightly raw-boned. The backbone is still visible with a continuous ridge. Some ribs can be seen and there is a small amount of fat cover. Ribs can still be felt. Intercostal spaces are smooth but can still be penetrated. …

Goat Interactive Nutrient Calculator

Using the Langston University

Interactive Nutrient Calculator

Practical goat nutrition involves providing sufficient nutrients for a desired level of productivity (milk, meat, or kids) at a reasonable cost. Nutrients are supplied via a combination of pastures, supplements, and other feedstuffs; adequate amounts are required for animals to produce at an economically viable level. For commercial meat goat production, the economics of nutrition are of paramount importance due to their great impact on cost of production and subsequent profit. For show, …